A healthy outside starts from the inside - Robert Urich

Water

Water is one of the single most important fluids you should drink throughout the day. Not only will water help to quench your thirst, it will also help with a multitude of other benefits, which include: 

  • increased concentration levels 
  • lubrication for the joints 
  • it cushions the brain, spinal cord and other sensitive tissues  
  • maintains blood pressure

If you are exercising, then remember to take a sports bottle with you to keep hydrated and cool.

Top up your water levels

You may also want to keep water in a jug next to your chair in your living room. This saves the amount of times you will have to get up to go to the kitchen and you can refill your glass several times throughout the day or night.

Frequently asked questions around hydration

I’m feeling unsteady on my feet, could this have anything to do with my water intake?

If you’ve been feeling a little unsteady on your feet, then don’t forget to hydrate yourself. This will not only help keep you hydrated it will also mean that many of the benefits listed above will be covered, which includes increased concentration and the lubrication of joints.

I have a good diet and do some moderate exercise throughout the week. However, I’ve been feeling tired, do you think this is anything to do with my water intake, as I don’t tend to drink frequently throughout the day?

While we would always advise to visit your GP to rule out any pre-existing medical conditions, dehydration will play a large part in making you feel lethargic. While teas and coffees count towards your daily water intake, nothing can replenish your body with hydration like water. Try to drink between 7 and 8 glasses of water per day.

I hate the taste of water and don’t drink tea or coffee. I have a sweet tooth so have been drinking fizzy drinks, which have cause me to have dental problems. Is there any way of making water bearable?

Fizzy drinks will be harmful to your teeth and can also pile on the pounds due to the amount of sugar just in one can! While they will give you an initial sugar rush – they will not be able to offer you the type of hydration needed to help replenish your body.  

For many people the taste of water can be disguised, using the following tips:

  • Try a few drops of cordial (sugar free is best) 
  • Cut up an orange, lemon, lime or even fresh fruits (strawberries, kiwi, blueberries) and add them to your water. This will help give it some flavour.  
  • Not so keen on fruit? Add herbs such as rosemary or thyme to an ice cube try and plop them into water to keep it chilled and great tasting.  
  • If you are really struggling then look to alternative sources of liquid such as milk, soups, tea and coffee. Alcohol should be limited.

Over 50s - balanced diet and regular exercise

Continue to carry on with diet and don’t forget to include 2 to 3 litres (around 7 to 8 glasses of water) into your diet each day.

Over 50s - no exercise and poor diet

Please refer to the NHS Eat Well Guide and in terms of exercise, where possible walk, run or cycle more. Swimming is a great alternative, which is less demanding on your joints. Don’t forget that vigorous housework and gardening also counts as physical activity too.

Over 60s to 70s - balanced diet and regular exercise

Continue to carry on with diet and don’t forget to include 2 to 3 litres (around 7 to 8 glasses of water) into your diet each day.

Over 60s to 70s - no exercise and poor diet

Please refer to the NHS Eat Well Guide. Please remember to include vegetables and more oily fish into your diet (twice a week). 

Over 70s to 80s - balanced diet and regular exercise

Continue to carry on with diet and don’t forget to include 2 to 3 litres (around 7 to 8 glasses of water) into your diet each day.

Over 70s to 80s - no exercise and poor diet

Please refer to the NHS Eat Well Guide. Please remember to include vegetables and more oily fish into your diet (twice a week).